ABOUT US
Brett Schenck
The Schenck law office is located near St. Louis, Missouri and can serve clients throughout the United States and other countries in intellectual property matters.
The Schenck Law Office provides legal services to clients focusing its practice on patent, trademark, and copyright matters.  Its founder, Brett A. Schenck, is a registered patent attorney with over 20 years experience both in the corporate and law firm environment representing clients ranging from individual inventors to large corporations. 

He has experience in prosecuting patents, trademarks and copyrights; managing outside patent counsel with U.S. and foreign prosecution work; determining which inventions require protection; monitoring third party patents and applications, providing right to use opinions; supporting IP litigation; analyzing products of third parties for enforcing intellectual property rights; negotiating joint development and confidentiality agreements; and counseling management on intellectual property matters. 

He has provided legal services for large corporations including Honda, Maytag (Hoover division), Diebold, Lenovo, Boeing, ZTE, and TRW as well as small businesses and individuals.

The following is a brief description of the types of Intellectual Property Law that the Schenck Law Office practices:

Patent

A patent for an invention is the grant of a property right to the inventor, issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Generally, the term of a new patent is 20 years from the date on which the application for the patent was filed in the United States or, in special cases, from the date an earlier related application was filed, subject to the payment of maintenance fees. U.S. patent grants are effective only within the United States, U.S. territories, and U.S. possessions. Under certain circumstances, patent term extensions or adjustments may be available.  There are three types of U.S. patents.  These are utility, design, and plant patents.

Utility patents

may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers any new and useful process, machine, article of manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.  Generally, the term of a new utility patent is 20 years from the date on which the application for the patent was filed in the United States or, in special cases, from the date an earlier related application was filed, subject to the payment of maintenance fees.

Design patents

may be granted to anyone who invents a new, original, and ornamental design for an article of manufacture; The term of a new design patent is 14 years from the date the patent is granted if filed before May 13, 2015 or 15 years from the date of the patent is granted if filed after May 13, 2015.

Plant patents

may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers and asexually reproduces any distinct and new variety of plant.  Generally, the term of a new utility patent is 20 years from the date on which the application for the patent was filed in the United States or, in special cases, from the date an earlier related application was filed, subject to the payment of maintenance fees.

Trademark

A trademark includes any word, name, symbol, device, or any combination, used, or intended to be used, in commerce to identify and distinguish the goods of one manufacturer or seller from goods manufactured or sold by others, and to indicate the source of the goods. A service mark is any word, name, symbol, device, or any combination, used, or intended to be used, in commerce, to identify and distinguish the services of one provider from services provided by others, and to indicate the source of the services.

Copyright

A Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (title 17, U.S. Code) to the authors of “original works of authorship,” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works.  A work that was created (fixed in tangible form for the first time) on or after January 1, 1978, is automatically protected from the moment of its creation and is ordinarily given a term enduring for the author’s life plus an additional 70 years after the author’s death.